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Abstract Detail


Regional Botany Special Lecture - Dr. Noel Holmgren

Holmgren, Noel H. [1].

Seven Decades of Research on the Botany of the Intermountain West.

The Intermountain Region is so called because it lies between the Sierra Nevada-Cascade Range on the west and the Rocky Mountains on the east. The area is the size of Texas, consisting of 250 named mountain ranges and plateaus interspersed among arid desert and verdant valleys with elevations ranging from 640 to 4342 m. Further habitat diversity comes in the form of wetlands (marshes, stream banks, and lakes) and drylands (alkaline, sand, clay, and gypsum soils weathered from sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic bedrock). Responding to this diversity of habitats are nearly 4000 species of vascular plants. Research on the floristics of the Intermountain Region has been ongoing since 1939. The first 30 years focused on collecting throughout the area until the writing of Intermountain Flora began in 1969. Intermountain Flora is an eight volume, fully illustrated series covering the vascular plants of the states of Utah, major parts of Nevada and Idaho, and lesser parts of Oregon, California, Arizona, and Wyoming. Seven volumes (totaling 3136 pages) of Intermountain Flora have been published, and the final volume should be completed about a year from now.


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1 - New York Botanical Garden, Institute of Systematic Botany, 200Th Street & Southern Boulevard, Bronx, New York, 10458-5126, USA

Keywords:
vascular flora
Intermountain region
Project history
plant geography.

Presentation Type: Special Presentation
Session: S2
Location: Ballroom 1/Cliff Lodge - Level B
Date: Monday, July 27th, 2009
Time: 11:00 AM
Number: S2001
Abstract ID:921


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