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Abstract Detail


Colloquium: Assembling the Tree of Life Colloquium

Brockington, Samuel, F [1], Alexandre, Roolse [2], Ramdial, Jeremy [3], Moore, Michael [4], Crawley, Sunny S [5], Hilu, Khidir W. [6], Dhingra, Amit [7], Soltis, Douglas E [8], Soltis, Pamela S. [9].

Phylogeny of the Caryophyllales and the Evolution of Differentiated Perianth.

Molecular phylogenetics has revolutionized our understanding of the Caryophyllales, and yet many relationships have remained uncertain, particularly at deeper levels. We have performed parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses on separate and combined data sets comprising nine plastid genes (12,000 bp), two nuclear genes (5000 bp), and the entire plastid inverted repeat (24,000 bp), giving a combined analyzed length of 42,006 bp for 36 species of Caryophyllales and four outgroups. Classical hypotheses argued that the early Caryophyllales had evolved in open, dry, marginal environments at a time when pollinators were scarce, and, as such, the ancestral caryophyllid flower was wind pollinated with an undifferentiated perianth. We re-evaluated these hypotheses in light of our phylogeny and find little support for anemophily as the ancestral condition; however, the early caryophyllid flower is suggested to have possessed an undifferentiated perianth. A subsequent minimum of nine origins of differentiated perianth is inferred. We discuss the research opportunities that this pattern offers to the field of evolutionary developmental genetics. Finally, we present evolutionary developmental data in the form of developmental morphology and in-situ gene expression analyses to examine one instance of evolution of differentiated perianth in Caryophyllales, within the ‘living stone’ family Aizoaceae.


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1 - University of Florida, Museum of Natural History, Museum Rd, Gainesville, Florida, 32611, USA
2 - University of Florida, Department of Botany, Florida Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 117800, Gainesville, Florida, University of Florid, USA
3 - University of Florida, Department of Botany, Florida Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 117800, Gainesville, Florida, 32611-7800, USA
4 - Oberlin College, Biology Department, 119 Woodland Street, Science Center K111, Oberlin, Ohio, 44074-1097, USA
5 - Virginia Tech, Biological Sciences, 2119 Derring Hall, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, USA
6 - Virginia Tech, Biological Sciences, Blacksburg, Virginia, 24061, USA
7 - Washington State University, Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, PO Box 646414, Pullman, WA, 99164-6414, USA
8 - University of Florida, Department of Botany, 220 Bartram Hall, P.O. Box 118526, Gainesville, Florida, 32611-8526, USA
9 - University of Florida, Department of Biology, Florida Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 117800, Gainesville, FL, 32611-7800, USA

Keywords:
none specified

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: C1
Location: Cottonwood C/Snowbird Center
Date: Tuesday, July 28th, 2009
Time: 3:00 PM
Number: C1008
Abstract ID:910


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