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Abstract Detail


Molecular Ecology and Evolution

Givens, Jeffery A. [1], Noyes, Richard D. [1].

Microsatellite development and variation in triploid Erigeron annuus (Asteraceae).

Microsatellites (SSRs) potentially offer a powerful means of evaluating genetic variation in natural populations and can be used in genetic mapping experiments that use heterozygous parents to associate homologous linkage groups. Plants that are polyploid present a special challenge for microsatellite analysis because to be fully informative one distinct allele is required per genome copy. In this study, microsatellite variation was explored in triploid apomictic Erigeron annuus. Potential loci were isolated from doubly enriched libraries prepared using biotin-streptadivin complexed-DNA and magnetic selection. Of 378 sequenced clones, 94 (25%) were scored as ‘high quality’ while it was determined that the remaining 75% were not suitable for microsatellite locus development. The 94 high quality loci include 29 (31%) perfect repeats, 38 (40%) imperfect repeats, and 27 (29%) compound repeats. The success rate in terms of the ability of primers developed for these loci to produce scorable PCR products and the ability of these markers to resolve three alleles per locus for triploid genotypes is discussed.


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1 - University of Central Arkansas, Department of Biology, 180 Lewis Science Center, Conway, Arkansas, 72035, USA

Keywords:
microsatellite
polyploidy
Erigeron
SSR.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: 35
Location: Maybird/Cliff Lodge - Level C
Date: Tuesday, July 28th, 2009
Time: 9:15 AM
Number: 35006
Abstract ID:885


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