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Abstract Detail


Molecular Ecology and Evolution

Burge, Dylan [1], Barker, William [2].

Evolution of nickel hyper-accumulation by Stackhousia tryonii, a serpentinite-endemic plant from Queensland, Australia.

The Australian serpentinite-endemic Stackhousia tryonii (Celastraceae) is a hyper-accumulator of nickel (Ni), sequestering up to 4.1% Ni by dry weight in its tissues. To elucidate evolution of Ni hyper-accumulation by S. tryonii we conducted phylogenetic analyses of Stackhousia using chloroplast DNA, which we combined with analyses of tissue Ni. Phylogenetic analyses of chloroplast DNA demonstrate that Stackhousia tryonii is a monophyletic species occupying a derived position within Stackhousia. Analyses of tissue Ni levels for 100 populations of Stackhousia indicate that S. tryonii consistently hyper-accumulates Ni, while most other members of Stackhousia contain normal levels of this element. The genetic isolation and uniform Ni hyper-accumulation ability of S. tryonii in comparison to remaining Stackhousia are consistent with strong and rapid specialization of the species to the ancient, Ni-rich, serpentinite-derived soils on which it is exclusively found.


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1 - Duke University, Department of Biology, 139 Biological Sciences Building, PO Box 90338, Durham, North Carolina, 27708, USA
2 - State Herbarium of South Australia, PO Box 2732, Kent Town, South Australia, 5071, Australia

Keywords:
Stackhousia
Celastraceae
nickel
Hyper-accumulator
Serpentinite
Queensland.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: 35
Location: Maybird/Cliff Lodge - Level C
Date: Tuesday, July 28th, 2009
Time: 9:00 AM
Number: 35005
Abstract ID:809


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