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Abstract Detail


Genomics / Proteomics

Leebens-Mack, James H. [1], Zuccolo, Andrea [2], Wall, P. Kerr [3], Bowers, John [4], Xiong, Zhiyong [5], Pires, J. Chris [6], Soltis, Douglas E [7], Soltis, Pamela S. [8], Ma, Hong [3], dePamphilis, Claude W. [3], Wing, Rod [9].

A Physical Map for the Amborella Genome Sheds Light on the Evolution of Angiosperm Genome Structure.

High information content fingerprints (HICF) were obtained for 32719 large insert clones from a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library representing approximately 5.5 haploid equivalents of the Amborella trichocarpa genome. The HIFC date were used to construct a draft physical map with 3106 contigs and 1356 singletons. BAC end sequences (BESs) were generated for the fingerprinted clones comprising 48.25 Mbp, or roughly 5.4% of the complete Amborella genome. BAC end sequences were related to the physical map and used to identify regions of synteny between regions of the Amborella genome and the sequenced Arabidopsis, Oryza, Populus and Vitis genomes. Regions of microsynteny were also observed in contiguously sequenced segments of the Amborella genome. The sequenced genomes were compared with respect to the frequency of regions of synteny with the Amborella physical map, and parsimony mapping of loss of synteny suggests a much slower rate of structural evolution in the Vitis lineage relative to the others. The Amborella physical map provides a glimpse of genome structure in the last common ancestor of extant angiosperms and sets the stage for generating a complete genome sequence for Amborella.


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Related Links:
Ancestral Angiosperm Genome Project


1 - University of Georgia, Department of Plant Biology, 4504 Miller Plant Sciences, Athens, GA, 30602, USA
2 - Arizona Genomics Institute, University of Arizona, Plant Sciences
3 - Pennsylvania State University, Department of Biology, Institute of Molecular Evolutionary Genetics, and The Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, University Park, Pennsylvania, 16802, USA
4 - University of Missouri, Plant Biology, Athens, GA, 30602, USA
5 - University of Missouri Columbia, Biological Sciences, 1201 Rollins Road, Life Sciences Center 311, Columbia, Missouri, 65211, USA
6 - University of Missouri Columbia, Biological Sciences, 1201 Rollins Road, Life Sciences Center 311, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
7 - University of Florida, Department of Botany, 220 Bartram Hall, P.O. Box 118526, Gainesville, Florida, 32611-8526, USA
8 - University of Florida, Florida Museum of Natatural History, Department Of Natatural Science, Gainesville, Florida, 32611-7800, USA
9 - Arizona Genomics Institute, University of Arizona, Plant Sciences, PO Box 210036, Forbes 303, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA

Keywords:
none specified

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: 9
Location: Cottonwood B/Snowbird Center
Date: Monday, July 27th, 2009
Time: 8:30 AM
Number: 9002
Abstract ID:734


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