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Abstract Detail


Conservation Biology

Cabi, Evren [1], Dogan, Musa [1].

Wild relatives of Wheat in Turkey.

Conservation of biodiversity of wild relatives of wheat are seems extremely important for improving agricultural production and increasing food security. They are also essential components of natural and semi-natural habitats as well as agricultural systems, and are therefore vital in maintaining ecosystem health. The species belonging to Triticum L., Aegilops L. and Amblyopyrum (Jaub. & Spach) Eig genera are constitutes the primary and secondary gene pools of wheat. As a part of revisional study of the tribe Triticeae Dumort in Turkey, lots of expeditions were accomplished to collect the wild relatives of wheat throughout Turkey. The results of these expeditions especially south-eastern part of Turkey between 2006 and 2009 showed that the range of threats such as habitat loss, degradation and mismanagement, over-collection, over grazing and climate change affect the future existence of wild relatives of wheat in Turkey. This paper covers the risks factors threatened the wild relatives of wheat for their future existence in Turkey, updated distribution maps including the germplasm collections and recommended conservational strategies towards sustaining these genetic resources in Turkey.


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1 - Middle East Technical University, Biological Sciences, Inonu Street, Ankara, 06531, Turkey

Keywords:
Wild relatives
wheat
Triticum.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: 58
Location: Wasatch A/Cliff Lodge - Level C
Date: Wednesday, July 29th, 2009
Time: 9:00 AM
Number: 58005
Abstract ID:711


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