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Abstract Detail


Symbioses: Plant, Animal, and Microbe Interactions

Moebius-Clune, Daniel [1], Pawlowska, Teresa [1].

Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi of Corn in New York State.

The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), phylum Glomeromycota, are important for plant nutrition in natural ecosystems. Their potential role in agroecosystem functioning is not fully characterized. The overall objective of our research is to explore the carbon allocation and nutrient translocation in AMF in mixed cropping of corn and common bean. Early perspectives on these fungi suggested a lack of host specificity and homogeneity of symbiotic functioning across the clade. It is now understood that the AMF species differ both in host specificity and the degree of mutualistic behavior with the host. Thus, prior to undertaking research into the role of AMF in particular agroecosystems, it is necessary to understand which of these fungi are present in the systems to be studied. We wish to use fungi in our greenhouse experiments that are likely to form associations with these same crops in the field. To select relevant fungi, we have sampled soils from numerous farms in several regions of NY State, and identified the dominant types of AM fungi present. We will present information about morphological and sequence type diversity in these fields.


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1 - Cornell University, Plant Pathology & Plant-Microbe Biology, 334 Plant Science Building, Ithaca, NY, 14853-5904, USA

Keywords:
Mycorrhizae
agroecosystems.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Topics
Session: P1
Location: Event Tent/Cliff Lodge
Date: Monday, July 27th, 2009
Time: 5:30 PM
Number: P1SY006
Abstract ID:632


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