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Abstract Detail


Pteridological Section/AFS

Rothfels, Carl [1], Windham, Michael [1], Pryer, Kathleen M. [1].

New insights into the relationships of Cystopteris, Acystopteris, and Gymnocarpium.

Cystopteris has a well-deserved reputation for intractability: its family and suprafamilial relationships are unclear, its generic relationships and closest relatives are contested, and one species—C. fragilis—is world-wide in distribution and has the dubious distinction of being “perhaps the most formidable biosystematic challenge in the ferns.” By integrating data from two plastid and two low-copy nuclear loci with those from morphology, cytology, and geography, we are able to address longstanding questions at each of these evolutionary scales. Cystopteris forms a well-supported clade with Acystopteris and Gymnocarpium; together these genera are sister to the remaining 2600+ species of the eupolypods II clade. The three genera are monophyletic as currently circumscribed, but relationships within and among their species are obscured by extensive  polyploidy. Low-copy nuclear data (gapCp; pgiC), in conjunction with chromosome counts and spore size data, show particular promise for untangling these often-reticulate relationships.


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1 - Duke University, Department of Biology, 139 Biological Sciences Building, PO Box 90338, Durham, North Carolina, 27708, USA

Keywords:
polyploidy
Cystopteris
Gymnocarpium
low copy nuclear markers
Spore size
reticulation.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for BSA Sections
Session: 1
Location: Alpine B/Snowbird Center
Date: Monday, July 27th, 2009
Time: 9:30 AM
Number: 1007
Abstract ID:625


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