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Abstract Detail


MSA - Ecology/Pathology

Jackson, Jason A. [1], Richter, Daniel D [1], Vilgalys, Rytas [2].

Fungal communities shift with changes in land use and edaphic properties.

The diversity and abundance of microbes in soil is largely influenced by the quantity and quality of organic inputs to the system. These inputs, of course, are influenced by the type and number of plants present in that system. Fungal communities in soil are especially responsive to changes in plant cover, and are shifted greatly with anthropogenic land use change. Here we examine the results of several molecular based surveys of fungal communities in soils from the Southeastern Piedmont. These soils are collected across a gradient of old-field successional plots and illustrate the high diversity of soil microbial communities and the dramatic changes in community structure during succession. In addition, theses studies suggest that the changes are linked to shifts in available carbon and nutrients in soil, properties that correlate with land use change. Finally, we discuss the impacts continued plantation forestry may have on these microbial communities.


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1 - Duke University, Nicholas School of the Environment, Campus Box 90328, Durham, North Carolina, 27708, United States
2 - Duke University, Department of Biology, 139 Biological Sciences Building, PO Box 90338, Durham, North Carolina, 27708, USA

Keywords:
soil
Diversity
land use change
molecular identification
molecular phylogenetics.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: 18
Location: Cottonwood A/Snowbird Center
Date: Monday, July 27th, 2009
Time: 11:15 AM
Number: 18005
Abstract ID:576


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