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Abstract Detail


Symbioses: Plant, Animal, and Microbe Interactions

Pickles, Brian J. [1], Green, D. Scott [2], Egger, Keith N. [3], Massicotte, Hugues [1].

Climate change and symbioses: growth and ectomycorrhizal development of Douglas-fir and Lodgepole pine seedlings on a north-south transect.

Climate change has the potential to generate large changes in the distribution of forest species. However, until recently, little interest has been directed at how important and complex below-ground associations, such as ectomycorrhizal (ECM) symbioses, may be affected. The current northern boundary of Interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) distribution is located in British Columbia at approximately 55oN, with recent predictions suggesting a large northward movement in the suitable climatic envelope for this species by 2085. Interior Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) is capable of establishment throughout BC, and may help to maintain populations of ECM fungi able to facilitate Douglas-fir regeneration in theoretically suitable areas outside of its current distribution. So this distribution boundary seems particularly suitable for investigation of the effects of climate change on tree species and their fungal symbionts.
From eight provenances each of Douglas-fir and Lodgepole pine, twenty seeds were planted under greenhouse conditions in soil collected from five locations on a north-south transect (800 seeds planted per species): the Interior Douglas-Fir Biogeoclimatic zone, two sites inside the northern boundary of Douglas-fir distribution, north of the current distribution boundary of Douglas-fir, and far to the northeast of the current distribution. Germination success, survival and growth of improved and wild seedlings were compared. Using morphological and molecular techniques, a sub-sample of seedlings from each combination of provenance/soil type was used to assess the composition of ECM fungal communities formed in the different soil types.
This study provides baseline information on the performance of improved and wild tree provenances in soils containing native fungal inoculum. The ECM communities that associate with each species were assessed to examine any similarities or differences between locations and/or seed provenances, and may help to identify potential biological limitations to germination and survival of Douglas-fir outside of its current distribution.


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1 - University of Northern British Columbia, Ecosystem Science & Management Program, 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC, V2N 4Z9, Canada
2 - University of Northern British Columbia, Ecosystem Science and Management Program, 3333 University Way, Prince George, B.C., V2N 4Z9, Canada
3 - University of Northern British Columbia, Ecosystem Science & Management Program, Prince George, BC, V2N 4Z9, Canada

Keywords:
ectomycorrhizas
climate change
regeneration
species distribution
latitudinal gradient
Douglas-fir
lodgepole pine.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: 64
Location: Wasatch B/Cliff Lodge - Level C
Date: Wednesday, July 29th, 2009
Time: 10:30 AM
Number: 64002
Abstract ID:572


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