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Abstract Detail


MSA - Cell and molecular biology/Physiology & Genetics

Simonin, Anna [1], Roper, Marcus [2], Glass, N. Louise [1].

Nutrient distribution within and between Neurospora crassa colonies is influenced by colony morphology and developmental age.

Fungi rely on the effective transportation of resources within and between colonies. This resource distribution is vital for many processes, such as the maintenance of colony homeostasis and growth, creation of symbioses with plants, recycling of nutrients in ecosystems, and degradation of substrates in industrial systems. The architecture and morphology of a hyphal network is thought to be a key determinant of transport ability. We hypothesize that the effectiveness of a colony to transport and distribute resources is dependant on the creation of an interconnected network, as well as the developmental age of the colony. Using an isotopically enriched amino acid tracer, we assessed the ability of two Neurospora crassa fusion mutants, which lack normal network development, to distribute the tracer over the colony. In addition, we measured resource mixing between N. crassa colonies of different developmental ages using fluorescent protein fusions. This study has allowed us to assess the importance of colony development and morphology in ascomycete resource transport.


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1 - University of California Berkeley, Plant and Microbial Biology, 341 Koshland Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720
2 - University of California Berkeley, Mathematics, Evans Hall, Rm. 1073, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA

Keywords:
Fungi
Neurospora
amino acid transport
stable isotope
fluorescence.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Topics
Session: P2
Location: Event Tent/Cliff Lodge
Date: Tuesday, July 28th, 2009
Time: 5:30 PM
Number: P2CG008
Abstract ID:453


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