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Abstract Detail


Mycological Section

Kluber, Laurel, A [1], Myrold, David, D [2].

Fungal and bacterial communities associated with ectomycorrhizal Piloderma mat and neighboring non-mat soils.

Piloderma fungi are a dominant ectomycorrhizal genus known to form dense, rhizomorphic mats in the organic horizons of forest soils. These fungal mats have been found to cover over 40% of the forest floor in some Douglas-fir stands in the Pacific Northwest, and are associated with a variety of physical and biochemical properties that distinguish them from the surrounding non-mat soils. It is also likely that Piloderma mats create a habitat that supports a unique microbial community. This study examined the fungal and bacterial communities associated with paired Piloderma mat and non-mat soils at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest in western Oregon. Each mat and non-mat area was repeatedly sampled at four times throughout the year. Characterization of the mat activity and community was achieved using a combination of chitinase enzyme assays, T-RFLP community profiles, clone libraries, and quantitative PCR of bacterial 16S rRNA and fungal ITS sequences. Piloderma mats had consistently greater chitinase activity, averaging ~60% higher than non-mats across all dates. Significant temporal variation was also seen with the highest mat activity in the early and late spring and the lowest activity occurring in the late summer. Both the fungal and bacterial communities differed between Piloderma mat and non-mat soils; however, the community composition did not vary seasonally. Quantitative PCR data showed significant seasonal variation in both sample types in addition to season-specific differences between the mat and non-mat populations. These data demonstrate that ectomycorrhizal Piloderma mats foster unique microbial communities and activities, which may have consequences in ecosystem functions.


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1 - Oregon State University, Crop and Soil Science, 3017 ALS bldg, Oregon State Univeristy, Corvallis, OR, 97330, USA
2 - Oregon State University, Crop and Soil Science, 3017 ALS bldg, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR , 97331, USA

Keywords:
Ectomycorrhizae
forest
soil
fungal communities
bacterial communities.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for BSA Sections
Session: 70
Location: Cottonwood C/Snowbird Center
Date: Wednesday, July 29th, 2009
Time: 2:45 PM
Number: 70006
Abstract ID:448


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