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Abstract Detail


Mycological Section

Lowrey, Tim [1], Garcia, Margaret [1], Porras-Alfaro, Andrea [1].

Diversity of plant-fungal symbioses in gypsophilic plants.

Gypsum (CaSO4) soils are stressful substrates for constituent plants and may give rise to a diverse set of endemic plant species. Plants have symbiotic relationships with complex fungal communities that live inside healthy plant tissues including roots, stems, and leaves. Little is known about fungal endophytes or mycorrhizal fungi in plants growing in stressful habitats such as gypsum soils. The main goal of this research was to investigate the diversity of fungal endophytes associated with nine gypsophilic angiosperm species collected at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Culturable fungal communities were identified using nrITS fungal specific primers. All taxa were colonized by a mixed community of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, dark septate and hyaline endophytes. Root-associated fungi were closely related to endophytes previously reported in semiarid grasses in New Mexico and Utah. Analyses of culturable fungi revealed that root and leaf communities are dominated by fungi within the order Pleosporales but roots and leaves harbor a distinct fungal assemblage. Alternaria and Preussia predominate in the leaves and endophytes closely related to Monosporascus and Phoma predominate in the roots.


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1 - University of New Mexico, Biology, Msc03 2020, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA

Keywords:
Fungal endophytes
gypsum
gypsophile.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for BSA Sections
Session: 70
Location: Cottonwood C/Snowbird Center
Date: Wednesday, July 29th, 2009
Time: 2:15 PM
Number: 70004
Abstract ID:445


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