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Abstract Detail


MSA - Systematics/Evolution

Horn, Bruce [1], Ramirez-Prado, Jorge [2], Moore, Geromy [2], Carbone, Ignazio [2].

Sexual reproduction in Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus.

Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus are potent producers of carcinogenic and hepatotoxic aflatoxins, polyketide-derived secondary metabolites that contaminate a wide variety of agricultural crops. Strains with opposite mating-type genes MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 within each species were crossed in an attempt to induce sexual reproduction. Lengthy incubation resulted in the development of multiple, indehiscent ascocarps containing asci and ascospores within the pseudoparenchymatous matrix of stromata, which places the teleomorphs in the genus Petromyces. Sexually compatible strains in both species belonged to different vegetative compatibility groups. The teleomorph of Petromyces flavus could not be distinguished morphologically from that of P. parasiticus. The two Petromyces species can be separated by anamorph morphology, mycotoxin profile, and molecular characters.


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1 - National Peanut Research Laboratory, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, P.O. Box 509, Dawson, GA, 39842, United States
2 - North Carolina State University, Center for Integrated Fungal Research, Department of Plant Pathology, Campus Box 7244, Partners III Building, Raleigh, NC, 27695, United States

Keywords:
aflatoxin
Petromyces
heterothallism
mating system
vegetative compatibility groups
ascospores.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Topics
Session: P2
Location: Event Tent/Cliff Lodge
Date: Tuesday, July 28th, 2009
Time: 5:30 PM
Number: P2SE028
Abstract ID:394


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