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Abstract Detail


Bryological and Lichenological Section/ABLS

Proulx, Monica W. [1], St. Clair, Larry L. [2].

The Lichen Flora of the Spring Mountains, Nevada, USA.

This research reports on the lichen flora of the Spring Mountains National Recreation Area (SMNRA), Humboldt –Toiyabe National Forest, Nevada. This survey is based on extensive collections made between 1997 and 2007, as part of an air pollution bio-monitoring program and baseline. The Spring Mountains are a sky island mountain range in the middle of the Mojave Desert, a unique ecosystem with average annual precipitation four times that of the surrounding desert floor (51 versus 10 cm/year). A floristic survey of the Spring Mountains lichen community represents a major contribution to the understanding of the lichen flora of the Mojave Desert, a poorly studied region in western North America. This information will also prove valuable for future bio-monitoring of potential air quality-related impact to this unusual island mountain system. To date, 101 species from 39 genera have been identified from 15 study sites. The flora is dominated by crustose species (47%), followed by foliose taxa (43%), and squamulose species (10%), with no fruiticose species reported. Lichens were sampled from all habitats and substrates including soil/moss, rock, bark/lignum (with 52% on rock, 30% on bark/lignum, and 18% on soil/moss). Comparisons with several other study sites in the Mojave Desert, show many similarities between floras, with some distinct differences. The Spring Mountains have the greatest species diversity, with 101 species, as compared to counts ranging from 35 to 75 from other Mojave Desert sites. The relative diversity and richness of the lichen flora in the Spring Mountains is likely due to increased precipitation and the habitat complexity of the area. Additional comparisons based on growth form distributions and substrate preferences are documented.


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1 - Brigham Young University, Department of Biology and M.L. Bean Life Science Museum, 193 M.L. Bean Life Science Museum, Provo, Utah, 84602, USA
2 - Brigham Young University, Biology Department and M.L. Bean Life Science Museum, 290 M.L. Bean Life Science Museum, Provo, Utah, 84602, USA

Keywords:
lichens
Nevada
Mojave Desert
Spring Mountains
Floristic survey.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for BSA Sections
Session: P1
Location: Event Tent/Cliff Lodge
Date: Monday, July 27th, 2009
Time: 5:30 PM
Number: P1BL003
Abstract ID:376


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