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Abstract Detail


Pollination Biology

Watrous, Kristal M. [1], Cane, James H. [1].

Breeding biology and pollinator assessment of threadstem milkvetch, Astragalus filipes.

Astragalus (Fabaceae) is an enormous and diverse plant genus with a cosmopolitan distribution, but the breeding biology of few Astragalus species is known. Astragalus filipes is a common and widespread species throughout the US Intermountain West and Great Basin and has been selected for use in restoration projects throughout its range. Information on the breeding biology of A. filipes is necessary for effective management and cultivation of this species. We examined reproductive output from four manual pollination treatments (autogamy, geitonogamy, xenogamy and distant xenogamy) in a common garden. We counted fruit and seed set, then germinated viable seeds to assess reproductive output as a measure of fitness. This species is self-compatible, but benefits strongly from xenogamous pollen transfer. Pollen transfer between distant seed accessions resulted in a slight decrease in seed germination, but no difference in fruit or seed set. Additionally, we surveyed wild pollinators and evaluated bee species for pollination efficiency and management. These observations provide critical information for management of A. filipes for commercial seed production.


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1 - Utah State University, Biology, 5305 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322-5305, USA

Keywords:
pollination
bees
Fabaceae
Reproductive biology
Astragalus.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: 23
Location: Wasatch A/Cliff Lodge - Level C
Date: Monday, July 27th, 2009
Time: 2:30 PM
Number: 23005
Abstract ID:292


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