Unable to connect to database - 17:37:42 Unable to connect to database - 17:37:42 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 17:37:42 SQL Statement is null or not a DELETE - 17:37:42 Botany & Mycology 2009 - Abstract Search
Unable to connect to database - 17:37:42 Unable to connect to database - 17:37:42 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 17:37:42

Abstract Detail


The conservation biology of fungi

Gange, Alan [1].

Fungal fruiting and climate change.

Fungi are important agents of decomposition and nutrient cycling in woodlands and many species with different life histories occur together in this habitat. Using a data set consisting of over 60,000 individual records of fruit body appearance, an analysis is presented of changes in fruiting patterns in the UK over the last 60 y. Fruiting of 315 species has changed dramatically over this time, with the length of the autumnal fruiting season having doubled. Saprotrophic and mycorrhizal fungi have responded differently; the former show extensions in their fruiting season, while the latter do not. I suggest that this is because saprotrophs are more affected by changes in temperature and rainfall, while mycorrhizal species are tied to their hostís phenology. Individualistic responses are common, even within host-parasite associations, leading to the suggestion that climate change will cause significant changes in fungal activity, community structure and ecosystem processes in woodlands.


Log in to add this item to your schedule

Related Links:
Alan Gange's web site


1 - Royal Holloway, University of London, School of Biological Sciences, Egham Hill, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX, UK

Keywords:
Mycorrhizae
sporocarps
phenology.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: SY7
Location: Ballroom 3/Cliff Lodge - Level B
Date: Tuesday, July 28th, 2009
Time: 1:45 PM
Number: SY7001
Abstract ID:241


Copyright © 2000-2008, Botanical Society of America. All rights