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Abstract Detail


Genetics Section

Liao, Irene T. [1], Driscoll, Heather [1], Renner, Tanya [2], Huston, Julie [1], Specht, Chelsea [1].

Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) as a functional genomic tool across monocots.

Traditional methods for genetic loss-of-function studies use techniques such as Agrobacterium tumefaciensT-DNA and transposon-mediated transformation. However, these methods pose limitations since they involve the formation of transgenic plants, which are often difficult to ascertain for non-model plant species. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) is a technique that utilizes recombinant viruses as vectors to knockdown endogenous gene expression. It has been used to identify new genes and their functions and to understand plant defense against pathogens,
metabolic pathways, and plant development in plants for which transformation is not possible. Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) has been used as a vector for VIGS in two commercial grasses, barley and wheat, the only examples of VIGS in monocots. Following successful use of BSMV to downregulate gene expression in tropical gingers (Zingiberales), a major lineage of non-grass monocots, we are developing protocols for VIGS in six monocot species representing palms (Chamaedorea), Asparagales (Iris, Allium, Hippeastrum) and early-diverging monocots (Acorus). BSMV presence is detected using Western blots and RT-PCR and is also photo-documented to capture phenotypic changes. Detecting the downregulation of the phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene in plants inoculated with BSMV constructs containing endogenous PDS demonstrates the ability to use BSMV as a vector in these species. With VIGS successful in a wider range of plants, this technique could be used to study genes and genetic networks involved in various aspects of evolutionary change across all monocots.


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1 - University of California, Berkeley, Plant and Microbial Biology, 111 Koshland Hall MC 3102, Berkeley, California, 94720-3102, USA
2 - University of California, Berkeley, Plant and Microbial Biology, 111 Koshland Hall MC 3102, Berkeley, CA, 94720-3102, USA

Keywords:
VIGS
monocots
reverse genetics
BSMV
PDS.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for BSA Sections
Session: P1
Location: Event Tent/Cliff Lodge
Date: Monday, July 27th, 2009
Time: 5:30 PM
Number: P1GN001
Abstract ID:236


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