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Abstract Detail


Developmental and Structural Section

Seago, James [1].

Anatomical Features of Some Selected Basal Angisoperms.

In spite of the attention being given to the basal angiosperms in recent publications and presentations, relatively little emphasis has been placed on the subterranean and submersed portions of the aquatic, moist soil, or drained soil plants of these angiosperms, especially the recently reclassified Trithuria (Nymphaeales, Hydatellaceae), Amborella (Amborellales, Amborellaceae), and Illicium (Austrobaileyales, Illiciaceae). For example, very small adventitious roots and stems of Trithuria have an endodermis with Casparian bands and suberin lamellae; it also has a modified hypodermis with some cell wall modifications. Its roots have a Cabomba-like, tiered RAM, and it develops small cortical air spaces and vascular tissue with few elements; the xylem cells in the stem are irregularly arranged. Both Amborella and Illicium have adventitious roots or their laterals with a diarch vascular cylinder arrangement in small roots and a complex endodermis (Casparian bands and suberin lamellae) and an irregular hypodermis with modified cell walls, but secondary tissues and a redivided endodermis are present in larger roots; they lack enlarged cortical air spaces in the specimens investigated.


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1 - State University of New York at Oswego, Biological Sciences, Oswego, NY, 13126, USA

Keywords:
Basal angiosperms
anatomy.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for BSA Sections
Session: 27
Location: Ballroom 3/Cliff Lodge - Level B
Date: Monday, July 27th, 2009
Time: 2:45 PM
Number: 27005
Abstract ID:233


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