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Abstract Detail


Teaching with basal fungal lineages

Powell, Martha [1].

Introduction: Teaching with Basal Fungal Lineages.

Basal fungal offer outstanding examples of organisms that can illustrate biological processes, as well as biodiversity. However, in botany, biology, microbiology and mycology courses, these fungi are often given cursory attention because of difficulty in accessing cultures that perform well and experiments that are amenable to a 2-3 hour laboratory period. In 1978, over thirty years ago, the Mycological Society of America held a workshop on lower fungi at the University of Georgia resulting in the manual Zoosporic Fungi in Teaching and Research. However, we now have a generation of teaching professionals who have not been introduced to lower fungi as excellent teaching tools. Recent molecularly-based phylogenetic analyses have revealed new relationships among the earliest evolving fungi, stimulating a revised taxonomic classification. With an increased understanding of the importance of basal fungi in the evolution of fungi, as well as an increased awareness of their impact on the environment, it is timely to disseminate information about cultures and techniques that work in the teaching laboratory. In this symposium, we present examples of  performing basal fungi suitable for undergraduate teaching laboratories.


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1 - University of Alabama, Department of Biological Sciences, Po Box 870344, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 35487, USA

Keywords:
Chytridiomycota
teaching
Fungi.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: SY12
Location: Cottonwood B/Snowbird Center
Date: Wednesday, July 29th, 2009
Time: 1:30 PM
Number: SY12001
Abstract ID:217


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