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Abstract Detail


Unusual fungal niches

Fell, Jack W.  [1], Scorzetti, Gloria [2].

Yeast communities in diverse habitats: from subtropical mangroves to Antarctic Dry Valleys.

Yeast community structure was examined in four diverse environments: 1) highly productive sub-tropical waters of the Florida Everglades that range from freshwater habitats dominated by sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) to marine mangrove environments, 2) low productivity open ocean waters of the Southern Ocean where water masses are defined by narrow temperature and salinity ranges, 3) highly productive and cold waters surrounding the Antarctic Peninsula, which is characterized by bird and animal rookeries, ice sheets and ice burgs, 4) soils of the Dry Valleys, Antarctica with soil moistures lower than 5% and summer temperature swings from -15°C to 27°C. The three aquatic environments were sampled with conventional plating methods, whereas the Dry Valley soils were examined via cloning and molecular sequence analysis.
Yeast communities in the Everglades habitat are highly diverse, with as many as 160 different species or genotypes, ~40% of which are undescribed. Population densities of ascomycetous and basidiomycetous yeasts range from 70 to1300 CFUL-1. Yeasts, filamentous fungi and other microeukaryotes play an important role in the detrital food web that helps sustain commercial fisheries in mangrove habitats throughout the world. Other natural habitats, such as the open ocean deep sea and the Antarctic Peninsula have populations of psychrophilic yeasts, which are specifically adapted to these cold environments. In contrast to natural habitats, yeast communities in urban marine coastal regions include indicators of pollution and terrestrial soil run-off (viz., Candida tropicalis, Trichosporon spp. etc). Dry Valley soils are particularly unique as cloning experiments revealed a microbial-based food web that includes plant and animal-associated fungi.


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1 - University of Miami, Rosenstiel School Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS), 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Key Biscayne, Fl, 33149, USA
2 - University of Miami, Rosenstiel School Marine and Atmospheric Science , 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Key Biscayne, 33149, USA

Keywords:
yeasts
mangroves
open ocean and deep sea
Antarctic Dry Valleys.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: SY3
Location: Ballroom 1/Cliff Lodge - Level B
Date: Monday, July 27th, 2009
Time: 1:00 PM
Number: SY3001
Abstract ID:213


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