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Abstract Detail


Phylogenetic and functional patterns of host plants and their associated fungi: implications for symbiotic co-evolution, community interactions, and ecosystem processes

Bidartondo, Martin I. [1].

Specificity in mycorrhizal symbioses.

Untangling the patterns of specificity in species interactions is fundamental to understanding how local and global biodiversity is organized and maintained over both ecological and evolutionary time scales. Specificity is a multifaceted and relative concept, encompassing from dependency and obligacy to range and receptivity that can have far-reaching ecological and evolutionary consequences. For instance, in mycorrhizal symbioses, narrow receptivity implies low ecological redundancy whereby a particular fungus is essential for the establishment, survival and/or diversification of a plant. This realization can turn the tables on plant conservation by throwing the spotlight on individual keystone fungi. I will survey and synthesize high specificity patterns recently uncovered in the symbiotic interactions between basidiomycetes and liverworts, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and non-photosynthetic plants, ectomycorrhizal fungi and trees in heathlands and forests, and basidio- and ascomycete fungi and orchids.


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1 - Imperial College London & Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, TW9 3DS, England

Keywords:
heathland
liverwort
myco-heterotrophy
mycorrhizas
orchid.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: SY13
Location: Rendezvous A/Snowbird Center
Date: Wednesday, July 29th, 2009
Time: 4:15 PM
Number: SY13006
Abstract ID:211


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