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Abstract Detail


Systematics Section

Guzmán, Felix Alberto [1], Dean, Ellen A. [2], Bohs, Lynn [3].

Hot and not so hot: phylogenetic relationships in Capsicum and Lycianthes (Solanaceae) .

The fruits of chili pepper (genus Capsicum) are much prized in cooking throughout the world due to their characteristic pungency. Thanks to this economic importance, many aspects of Capsicum have been relatively well studied; however, the relationships among Capsicum species and between it and its sister genus Lycianthes have remained enigmatic. A molecular cladistic study was performed to provide a phylogenetic framework for Capsicum and Lycianthes using the most complete sampling of the genera to date and employing sequence data from the chloroplast regions ndhF and trnT-F and nuclear ITS and waxy. The combined data set shows that Capsicum forms a strongly supported monophyletic group. Species of Capsicum fall into two strongly-supported clades. One includes four wild species (C. geminifolium, C. lycianthoides, C. lanceolatum, and C. rhomboideum) with white or yellow flowers. At least two species of this clade (C. rhomboideum and C. lanceolatum) are known to have non-pungent fruits and 2n = 26 chromosomes, in contrast to the number of 2n = 24 commonly found in other Capsicum species. The other clade includes wild and cultivated species with 2n = 24 and variable in flower color and degree of fruit pungency. On the other hand, Lycianthes is composed of three principal clades. One includes the four Old World species included in the study as well as species from Central America and Mexico. The second clade comprises species widespread in the New World from Mexico through South America and includes the type species of this genus (L. lycioides). The third clade consists solely of the Mexican species L. pilifera. Therefore, this study supports the monophyly of Capsicum but not Lycianthes and suggests that Lycianthes may need to be recircumscribed in order to make it monophyletic.


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1 - University of Utah, Department of Biology, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84105, USA
2 - UC Davis Center for Plant Diversity, Plant Sciences M.S. 7, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA, 95616, U.S.A.
3 - University of Utah, Department of Biology, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84112, USA

Keywords:
Capsicum
Lycianthes
chili pepper
phylogeny.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for BSA Sections
Session: P1
Location: Event Tent/Cliff Lodge
Date: Monday, July 27th, 2009
Time: 5:30 PM
Number: P1SP071
Abstract ID:158


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