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Abstract Detail


MSA - Cell and molecular biology/Physiology & Genetics

Kurtzman, Ralph [1].

Mushrooms and the Gas Laws.

Many living things including the basidiomata of mushrooms depend on negative geotropism. Although none are photosynthetic, many mushroom also show phototropism. However, probably all show chemotropism. Most of us may remember that, “one formula weight of ideal gas occupies 22.4 liters at standard temperature and pressure.” Methane (F.W. 16) and water vapor (F.W. 18) are two of the lighter gases. Oxygen that is required for growth is much heavier at F.W. 32, but carbon dioxide, the product of metabolism, is the heaviest common gas of biological importance at F.W. 44. Since the biological purpose of mushroom basidiomata is to distribute spores, and most are distributed by air currents, they must be enough above their surroundings to catch air currents. The area closest to the ground will have the highest carbon dioxide, and the most obstacles to inhibit air movement. As a result, mushroom stipes grow until they are above high concentrations of carbon dioxide.


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1 - Micologia Aplicada International, 445 Vassar Ave, Berkeley, CA, 94708, USA

Keywords:
Basidiomata
Chemotropism
Carbon dioxide
Spore dispersal.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Topics
Session: P2
Location: Event Tent/Cliff Lodge
Date: Tuesday, July 28th, 2009
Time: 5:30 PM
Number: P2CG002
Abstract ID:122


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